Map visualization: Visualizing vector data

Learn how to display, style and label feature data.

Basics

How-to guides

Frequently asked questions

Reference guides

Data Formats: GeoJSON

Decode and visualize data in the GeoJSON format (*.json, *.geojson).

Basics

Frequently asked questions

Data Formats: glTF

glTF is a web-friendly format for modeling 3D meshes, similar to the Collada format. The standard was first introduced in 2015 by Khronos.

For more information about the GLTF format, visit the Khronos website at: https://www.khronos.org/gltf.

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Frequently asked questions

Data Formats: GML

The Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Geography Markup Language (GML) is an XML-based data format for describing, storing and exchanging geographical data. LuciadLightspeed provides support for several versions of the GML format. The LuciadRIA GML API allow you to integrate GML data files into LuciadRIA applications.

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Frequently asked questions

Data Formats: Google Maps

Google (Static) Maps API image service is a web mapping service provided by Google, offering traditional road maps and aerial photo views.

The LuciadRIA Google Maps functionality integrates the Google Maps imagery service into LuciadRIA.

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Frequently asked questions

Data Formats: HSPC

The Hexagon Smart Point Cloud (HSPC) format offers tiled and multi-leveled point cloud data which can be loaded visualized natively by LuciadRIA.

HSPC is a proprietary Hexagon format. New Hexagon Geosystems sensors, such as the BLK2GO or the BLK360, produce HSPC data.

The HSPC format describes a 3D tiles hierarchy, using :

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Frequently asked questions

Getting Started: First application

Get started with the LuciadRIA API, and integrate it into your first application project.

Basics

How-to guides

Frequently asked questions

Getting Started: Installation

Set up your system so that you can start developing with LuciadRIA.

Basics

How-to guides

Frequently asked questions

Reference guides

Data Formats: KML

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML-based file format for storing and visualizing geographic data in Earth browsers. The file format was originally developed by Keyhole Inc. for use with their Earth Viewer application, which is currently known as Google Earth.

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Frequently asked questions

Data Formats: OGC 3D Tiles

The OGC 3D Tiles protocol is designed for streaming and rendering massive 3D geospatial content such as Photogrammetry, 3D Buildings, BIM/CAD, Instanced Features, and Point Clouds from a server to a client. It defines a hierarchical data structure and a set of tile formats which deliver renderable content.

In LuciadRIA, we support 3D tiles which contain a payload with:

The OGC 3D Tiles format describes the structure of a 3D tile hierarchy. It consists of:

Basics

How-to guides

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Map visualization: Visualizing raster data

Learn how to display and style raster data.

Basics

How-to guides

Frequently asked questions

OGC Standards: OGC SLD Styling

LuciadRIA allows you to structure styling information according to OpenGIS Styled Layer Descriptor (SLD) Profile and Symbology Encoding (SE) standards, and apply that styling information when visualizing a FeatureLayer.

As such, you can separate style from content.

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How-to guides

Frequently asked questions

Data Formats: OGC WFS

A OGC Web Feature Service (WFS) service client allows you to insert, update, delete, query and discover geographic features on an OGC server. WFS delivers GML representations of simple geospatial features in response to queries from HTTP clients. Clients access geographic feature data through WFS by submitting a request for just those features that are needed for an application.

The OGC WFS specification defines a standard interface for querying and manipulating geographic data. Queries can be formulated based on various spatial and non-spatial constraints, as defined by the OGC Filter specification.

A WFS provides geographic information in a rich format, without any prior interpretation or rendering, and with full georeferencing. This contrasts with, for instance, the WMS interface, which renders maps on the server side and returns simple images to the client. The default exchange format for geographic features is GML, another OGC standard.

The LuciadRIA WFS client API provides a simple framework for connecting to a WFS and retrieving feature data from it.

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Data Formats: OGC WMS

An OGC Web Map Service (WMS) returns static maps, rendered as images. The WMS specification defines a standard web service interface for the retrieval of maps of geographical data over the Internet. In general, a WMS is accessed by a client application that provides the user with interactive controls.

The LuciadRIA WMS Client API provides an easy framework to connect with a WMS service and use the available data in an application. You can build programs that access all information published inside the WMS capabilities, choose the desired layers and visualize the resulting data on the map.

Basics

How-to guides

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Reference guides

Data Formats: OGC WMTS

An OGC Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) serves digital maps in the form of predefined image tiles. The OGC WMTS specification standardizes how a WMTS server publishes the available images, as well as how the images are exchanged between a WMTS server and a WMTS client.

Since the structure of the image data is strictly defined, visualizing data from a WMTS server is usually much more efficient than from a WMS server.

The LuciadRIA WMTS client API provides a WMTS model, and API to inspect the capabilities of a WMTS server.

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How-to guides

Frequently asked questions

Big Data: Large feature data sets on a LuciadRIA map

The visualization of a large data set on a map poses 2 big challenges:

Here you will learn about the different available options in the LuciadRIA API to visualize such large feature datasets on a LuciadRIA map.

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How-to guides

Reference guides

Geodesy and Geometry: Geometry

The LuciadRIA Geometry functionality comes with the Advanced GIS Engine component, available in the @luciad/ria-geometry npm package. It provides support for the calculation of constructive boolean operations of shapes in 2D spaces. This functionality is useful for various applications. For example, you can:

The Advanced GIS Engine component supports the standard LuciadRIA shapes.

Basics

Reference guides

Getting Started: Product reference information

Find out which data types are supported out-of-the-box, which product tier gets you what functionality, and what some of the commonly used terms mean.

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How-to guides

Map visualization: Working with the map

The main entry point for visualization in LuciadRIA is the Map. You use a map or view to determine which layers to show, and to perform functions such as zooming in on particular areas, limiting the area that the user can see or interact with, and so on.

Basics

How-to guides

Reference guides

Getting Started: Migrating to ES6

Overview of considerations for upgrading your project from AMD modules to ES6 modules.

Basics

Getting Started: Integration

LuciadRIA can be integrated with many technologies and frameworks.

Basics

How-to guides

Reference guides

Map visualization: Interacting with the view

To convert user input into actions on the view, the LuciadRIA API uses the concept of a Controller. Controllers allow the user to use the mouse, keyboard or touch input to:

Basics

How-to guides

Reference guides

Architecture: Performance guidelines

Learn how to maintain the performance of the LuciadRIA map.

How-to guides

Models: Model references

Learn how you can support geospatial data references.

LuciadRIA supports a wide range of georeferences. Find out how to integrate your geospatial data reference.

Basics

How-to guides

Models: Handling feature data

Learn how to decode your vector data into LuciadRIA shapes.

Basics

How-to guides

Models: Handling raster data

Learn how to decode your raster data as images for image models for further processing and visualization.

Basics

How-to guides

Architecture: Core concepts

The idea behind the MVC design pattern is to separate the data, the representation of the data, and the user interaction from each other. This separation results in a simpler design of the application and a higher flexibility and re-usability of code.

The LuciadRIA API consists of the following MVC components:

Basics

Data Formats: Bing Maps

Bing Maps (previously named Virtual Earth) is a web mapping service provided by Microsoft, offering traditional road maps, aerial photo views, and searching capabilities.

The LuciadRIA Bing Maps functionality integrates the Bing Maps imagery service into LuciadRIA. More specifically, you can do the following:

Basics

Data Formats: Fusion client (LTS)

The LuciadRIA API to connect with LuciadFusion LTS services has two purposes:

Basics

Architecture: Deployment

Learn how to deploy a LuciadRIA based application.

Basics

Map visualization: Visualizing a grid

Learn how to add a grid, such as a typical grid with meridian and parallel lines, to your view.

Basics

Models: Handling elevation data

Learn how to add elevation data to your LuciadRIA application.

Basics

Getting Started: Main features and benefits

Learn more about the features and benefits of the LuciadRIA product.

Basics

Getting Started: User Guides

The LuciadRIA product comes with a number of more elaborate demo or sample applications for which we provide a user guide. The collection of available user guides is found on this page.

User guides

Military Symbology: Military symbology

The Defense Symbology component, available from the @luciad/ria-milsym NPM package, provides support for several military standards, including MIL-STD 2525b, MIL-STD 2525c, APP-6A, APP-6B and APP-6C. These standards define a symbol set that is used to plan and execute military operations in support of Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) functions. The MIL-STD 2525 standards were developed by the United States Department of Defense (DOD), while the APP-6 standards were developed by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). As the APP-6 standards are partially derived from MIL-STD 2525a, they share many symbols.

The Defense Symbology component allows a LuciadRIA user to create MIL-STD 2525b, MIL-STD 2525c, APP-6A, APP-6B, and APP-6C symbols, and visualize them on a map.

How-to guides

Reference guides

Panoramas: Panorama

Panoramas are photos with a large field-of-view, often covering the entire 3D sphere around the sensor: 360 degrees on the horizon, 90 degrees up and 90 degrees down. In LuciadRIA, you can easily visualize panoramas processed by LuciadFusion, or connect to panoramas in a custom format.

Basics

How-to guides